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How to fix noisy Ducati Clutches, if you don't believe this is "character"

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Old Rider:
Brilliant.
I have been lucky enough to get a whole stack's worth of 1098 plates from a friendly local specialist (Peak Performance).
The grinding/filing mod appears to apply to the Paso end-plate - I can't see it being referred to as necessary for the doubled-up friction plates.  I hope that's right...


Gonna have a go right now - fingers crossed...


Edit: (by Vince, in Admin mode): Regardless of the many ways to 'cook' this mod, the key thing is to avoid a square section resting on a round section. That creates a little step and you launch-stall the bike as it slips off the little step just after you moved a couple of m, right into the traffic! Me pointing that out to Frasers is what got the mod banned in Aus in the first place. Obviously Paso plates have long stopped being available so the double friction plate is fine, and a quick hit to knock off the square edge on the bottom one so it is basically aligned with the rounded surface should stop the step phenomenon occurring; it always has for me :).

VinceS:

--- Quote from: Old Rider on 30 Aug 2013, 02:41 AM ---So, all I need to do is find a dealer with a couple of s/h friction plates he's willing to part with, preferably steel and then place them in the basket/hub beneath the existing stack. Will any Ducati dry clutch plates do?
--- End quote ---
Yes, Yes, Yes and Yes.

The differences even up to 1098 are only in basket bearing & nut size and all the clutch plates interchange.

Old Rider:
So, all I need to do is find a dealer with a couple of s/h friction plates he's willing to part with, preferably steel and then place them in the basket/hub beneath the existing stack. Will any Ducati dry clutch plates do?   The bike is a '93 999

VinceS:

--- Quote from: Old Rider on 24 Aug 2013, 07:05 PM ---A friend with a 900ss has simply re ordered his plates by putting a friction plate in first instead of two plain plates.
--- End quote ---
Not possible! The correct answer is to put two friction plates in first. If just reordering them there will not be enough plate height left to make it to the top of the basket so the pressure plate would hit the inner hub and the clutch would never engage. The plain plates are the steel ones and they are what is already at the bottom of the stack so I can be very sure he didn't add one and make a difference! The idea is to put friction plates in first which go over the bottom of the inner hub and hit the bottom of the basket and lift what WAS the bottom plain/steel plate off the bottom of the inner hub. This is the action which causes the rattle to disappear (while the clutch is released).


--- Quote from: Old Rider on 24 Aug 2013, 07:05 PM --- This has silenced the racket beautifully
--- End quote ---
Assuming he has added steels further up the stack at best using one plate will be a short lived solution, I am surprised it works at all. All it can do is stop a bit of relative movement by setting up a kind of temporary clutch action between the bottom steel on the inner hub and the basket, this wouldn't last long before the friction plate lugs wear and the effect is lost. "Jumpy" starts would also be a high likelihood event for him!


--- Quote from: Old Rider on 24 Aug 2013, 07:05 PM --- but he says he's heard there's extra pressure put on the basket bearing by doing this. Does anyone know how true this is, if there have been failures
--- End quote ---
Yes there would be extra axial load but this is not a problem of consequence. Bearings have radial and axial ratings and this bearing already has a high radial component from the action of the gear drive to the basket. Adding the relatively tiny axial load from the clutch springs and expecting the bearing to fail is like farting and expecting the bike to wheelstand, it ain't gunna happen! It is already a widespread practice either by DIY as described here or professional solutions as mentioned below:

--- Quote from: VinceS on 14 Jan 2013, 02:16 PM ---If you notice most aftermarket clutches have dealt with this issue in one way or another, they stack off the bottom of the basket and have typically got flat bottoms on their baskets so no "special" shaped friction pads are required. I have seen various slight variations on the way it is done but they are all an improvement on the original!
--- End quote ---


--- Quote from: Old Rider on 24 Aug 2013, 07:05 PM --- and how much of a problem it is to replace the bearing if it should fail?
--- End quote ---
If you regard "degree of difficulty" to change oil & filter as 1 out of 10, to do this clutch mod is about 2 out of 10 and to change the brg would be 3 out of 10, primary additional task being to undo the FB nut (B=Big) as shown in pic below (http://hunterdog.org.au/DiscussionBoard/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=193.0;attach=282;image)


--- Quote from: Old Rider on 24 Aug 2013, 07:05 PM ---I'd does sound a little too good to be true ...
--- End quote ---
Its true. Remember as discussed below NFI were doing this "quiet" mod before I pointed out they were only doing it half right and they stopped doing it rather than fix their procedure. Thousands of Ducati riders already have first hand experience of this working when done properly, so here's one more, or at least there will be when he does it properly!.....

Old Rider:
A friend with a 900ss has simply re ordered his plates by putting a friction plate in first instead of two plain plates.  This has silenced the racket beautifully but he says he's heard there's extra pressure put on the basket bearing by doing this.
Does anyone know how true this is, if there have been failures and how much of a problem it is to replace the bearing if it should fail?

I'd does sound a little too good to be true ...

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